Poetry at Beinecke Library

US Poet Laureate Natasha Trethewey Reading at Beinecke 2-14

Posted in Announcements, Beinecke Collections, Exhibitions, Poetry at Yale by beineckepoetry on February 7, 2013

Thursday, 14 February 2013 at 4:30 PM

A Reading from Thrall by US Poet Laureate Natasha Trethewey

at Beinecke Library, 121 Wall Street, New Haven, CT

Natasha Trethewey is the 19th United States Poet Laureate (2012-2013). In his citation, Librarian of Congress James Billington wrote “Her poems dig beneath the surface of history—personal or communal, from childhood or from a century ago—to explore the human struggles that we all face.” She is the author of Thrall (2012), Native Guard (Houghton Mifflin), for which she won the 2007 Pulitzer Prize, Bellocq’s Ophelia (Graywolf, 2002), which was named a Notable Book for 2003 by the American Library Association, and Domestic Work (Graywolf, 2000). She is also the author of Beyond Katrina: A Meditation on the Mississippi Gulf Coast (University of Georgia Press).

This event is in conjunction with the Beinecke Library’s current exhibition:

By Hand: A Celebration of the Manuscript Collections of Yale University’s Beinecke Rare Book and Manuscript Library

On view January 18 – April 29, 2013

By Hand celebrates the fiftieth anniversary of Yale’s Beinecke Rare Book and Manuscript with an exploration of its manuscript collections.  The exhibition begins where the Yale College Library collection of early manuscripts began, with a mirror of humanity, a copy of the Speculum humanae salvationis given by Elihu Yale.  It ends with the manuscripts and drafts of “Miracle of the Black Leg,” a poem written by U.S. Poet Laureate Natasha Trethewey while she was a research fellow at the Beinecke Library in 2009.

Manuscript, from the Latin term “by hand,” derives from the ablative case:  locational, instrumental, situated always in relation to something or someone else.  Like the term, this exhibition explores the reflections of humanity in the Beinecke’s manuscript collections, presenting them as markers of the social contracts of love, creativity, need, power, that bind us into historical record even as they bind us to one another.

The exhibition ranges across the Beinecke Library manuscript collections, in an extraordinary display of the Library’s manuscript holdings, from papyri of the 2nd century A.D. through working drafts by contemporary poets, from manuscripts in the original Yale Library to recent additions to the collections. On view are manuscripts, notes, and proof copies of works by Langston Hughes, Rachel Carson, Edith Wharton, Zora Neale Hurston, Terry Tempest Williams, James Joyce, F. T. Marinetti, Goethe, and others; the Voynich Manuscript, the Vinland Map, the Lewis and Clark expedition map and journals, the Martellus map; the last paragraphs of Thoreau’s manuscript of Walden; letters, postcards, poetry, and notes by Ernest Hemingway, Gertrude Stein, Georgia O’Keeffe, Franz Kafka, Mark Twain, Erica Jong, and others;  early manuscripts from a tenth-century Byzantine prayer roll, a fragment of lyric verse on papyri, the Rothschild Canticles, a fourteenth-century ivory writing tablet, and the first illuminated medieval manuscript known in a North American collection.

Image:Natasha Trethewey, working notes for “Miracle of the Black Leg, ca. 2009; loaned by the author to the exhibiton, By Hand

Gertrude Gertrude Stein Stein

Posted in Announcements, Beinecke Collections, Exhibitions, Poetry at Yale, Readings at Beinecke by beineckepoetry on October 25, 2012

“Gertrude Gertrude Stein Stein: What are the Questions?”
by Joan Retallack, poet, essayist, critic, and professor at Bard College

Friday, October 26 at 5:00 pm

a lecture in honor of the exhibition

“Descriptions of Literature”:
Texts and Contexts in the Gertrude Stein and Alice B. Toklas Papers
on view October 8–December 14, 2012

and

the Gertrude Stein Society Meeting
at Beinecke Library,  Friday October 26, 2012
Registration and Information

Alice B. Toklas and Gertrude Stein with Pepe and Basket, [1932]

Gertrude Stein at Beinecke

Posted in Announcements, Beinecke Collections, Exhibitions, Poetry at Yale by beineckepoetry on October 22, 2012

“Descriptions of Literature”:
Texts and Contexts in the Gertrude Stein and Alice B. Toklas Papers
Exhibition on view October 8–December 14, 2012

Gertrude Gertrude Stein Stein: What are the Questions?
by Joan Retallack, poet, essayist, critic, and professor at Bard College
Exhibition opening lecture, Friday, October 26 at 5:00 pm

Gertrude Stein Society Meeting
Friday October 26, 2012
Registration and Information

“Descriptions of Literature”: Texts and Contexts in the Gertrude Stein and Alice B. Toklas Papers

Celebrating the recent publication of several new editions of Gertrude Stein’s work, “Descriptions of Literature” explores Stein’s creative process and writing life as documented in materials drawn from the extraordinarily rich Gertrude Stein and Alice B. Toklas Papers housed in the Yale Collection of American Literature. The exhibition considers Stein’s work in various genres, including poetry, fiction, plays, essays, and writing for children, tracing the evolution of key works; additionally, the exhibition reveals something of the environment in which these works were created, from the domestic life Stein shared with Alice B. Toklas, her muse, publisher, companion, and caretaker to her creative interactions with fellow artists and writers Thornton Wilder, Carl Van Vechten, and others. The exhibition offers a portrait of Stein’s life and creative process represented in manuscript drafts, notebooks, typescripts, correspondence, photographs, books and printed materials, and personal effects.

This exhibition was organized with the assistance of Ariel Doctoroff, Y’2013, and Charlotte Parker, Y’2013.

“Descriptions of Literature” carefully considers three of Stein’s works, all recently reissued by the Yale University Press: To Do: A Book of Alphabets and Birthdays (introduced by Timothy Young and illustrated by Giselle Potter; Ida: A Novel (edited by Logan Esdale); and Stanzas in Meditation, The Corrected Edition (edited by Susannah Hollister and Emily Setina).

Poet and critic Joan Retallack will give the exhibition opening lecture, “Gertrude Gertrude Stein Stein: What are the Questions?”, at the Library on Friday, October 26 at 5:00 pm.

The Gertrude Stein Society will hold a one-day symposium at the Beinecke Library on Friday October 26th, 2012.  The event will include two plenary sessions, one on Stanzas in Meditation and the other on the topic of Stein and war, together with a round-table discussion on teaching Stein in the classroom.  Anyone wishing to attend the Symposium must reserve a spot in advance.  You can make your reservation by emailing Stein Society President Amy Moorman Robbins at Amy.Robbins@hunter.cuny.edu. Please put Symposium Reservation in the subject line and include in the email your name, affiliation if any, and contact information.  Additional information about the Stein Society Symposium can be found online: Gertrude Stein Symposium; for more information about the Stein Society, visit their website:   http://www.gertrudesteinsociety.org/index.html.

Image: Gertrude Stein, photographed by Man Ray in 1920.

Exile as Destiny Online

Posted in Announcements, Beinecke Collections, Exhibitions, Poetry at Yale by beineckepoetry on July 23, 2012

Beinecke Library announces the opening of its latest web exhibition, Exile as Destiny: Czesław Miłosz and America. The web gallery includes selections from the full exhibition, which was on view October 24 through December 17, 2011.

Exile as Destiny celebrates the centennial of Czesław Miłosz (1911-2004), Polish poet, novelist, diplomat, and Nobel Laureate, with an exhibition drawn from the library’s holdings. The manuscripts, documents, and photographs on display document Miłosz’s great works of literature and also reveal lesser-known aspects of Miłosz’s multifaceted relationship with America, with his adopted home in California, with fellow émigré authors, and with the English language.

Researchers are welcome to consult the Czesław Miłosz Papers (GEN MSS 661) at the Beinecke. The papers consist of writings, correspondence, photographs, personal papers, audio material, and printed material (including newspaper clippings, printed ephemera, and clan- destine samizdat publications), spanning the years 1880–2000, with the bulk of the material dating from 1940 to 1989. While some writings, photographs, and personal documents predate the Second World War, the earliest correspondence dates from 1946.

For further information about the Czesław Miłosz Papers and other collections of Eastern European émigré literature (including the papers of Joseph Brodsky, Aleksander Wat, Witold Gombrowicz, and Tomas Venclova), please contact the Beinecke Library Reference Staff.

Image: Photograph of Czesław Miłosz reading the journal Kultura, 1951

TODAY: Exhibition Opening

Posted in Announcements, Beinecke Collections, Exhibitions, Poetry at Yale by beineckepoetry on February 15, 2012

Please join us  February 15, at 4:30 pm on the Beinecke Library mezzanine for the opening of the Beinecke’s spring exhibition, “Remembering Shakespeare.”

New Exhibition

Posted in Announcements, Beinecke Collections, Exhibitions, Poetry at Yale by beineckepoetry on November 3, 2011

Exile as Destiny: Czeslaw Milosz and America

On view October 24 through December 17, 2011

He had his home, posthumous, in the town of New Haven,
In a white building, behind walls
Of translucent marble like turtle shell
—Czesław Miłosz, from “Beinecke Library.” Provinces. New York: Ecco Press, 1991.

The life of Czesław Miłosz (1911-2004), Polish poet, novelist, diplomat, and Nobel Laureate, spanned a time of political upheavals and social turmoil. He lived in Nazi-occupied Warsaw, in the Paris of exiled literati, and in the United States, perched atop the Berkeley hills with a view of San Francisco Bay. The Beinecke Rare Book and Manuscript Library celebrates the centennial of Czesław Miłosz, renowned author of Bells in Winter, Captive Mind and Native Realm, with an exhibition drawn from the library’s holdings. The manuscripts, documents, and photographs on display reveal lesser-known aspects of Miłosz’s multifaceted relationship with America, with his adopted home in California, with fellow émigré authors, and with the English language.

Related Conference: Milosz and America

Party!

Posted in Announcements, Beinecke Collections, Exhibitions by beineckepoetry on September 20, 2011

Multitudes: A Celebration of the Yale Collection of American Literature, 1911 – 2011
EXHIBITION CLOSING PARTY
Friday, September 23, 2011 at 5:00

More about Multitudes: http://beineckepoetry.library.yale.edu/2011/09/14/multitudes/

Beinecke Rare Book & Manuscript Library
Yale University, 121 Wall Street, New Haven
Free and open to the public

Multitudes

Posted in Announcements, Beinecke Collections, Exhibitions, Poetry at Yale by beineckepoetry on September 14, 2011
Multitudes: A Celebration of the Yale Collection of American Literature, 1911–2011
July 8 through October 1, 2011

Do I contradict myself?
Very well then . . . . I contradict myself;
I am large . . . . I contain multitudes.

Walt Whitman, from Leaves of Grass, 1855

Founded in 1911 when Yale College graduate Owen Franklin Aldis donated his distinguished library of first editions of American fiction, drama, and poetry to the Yale Library, the Collection of American Literature stands as one of the most important collections of its kind. In the century following Aldis’s gift, the Collection has continued to grow, building on core areas and expanding to include complementary materials, from individual manuscripts to expansive literary archives, from little magazines and lively ephemera to high-tech artists’ books. The highlights exhibited in Multitudes: A Celebration of the Yale Collection of American Literature, 1911–2011 reveal areas of bibliographic strength and new development while demonstrating the Collection’s extraordinary richness, eclecticism, and depth. From the colonial period to the present, the Collection celebrates American Literature as a living art form with a complex history. Its evolving and vibrant traditions are a subject worthy of both rigorous scholarly attention as well as leisurely pursuit for the general reader.

Image: Samuel Hollyer, lithograph from a daguerreotype of Walt Whitman by Gabriel Harrison, 1855.  Title page, Leaves of Grass, first edition 1855.  An example of the Yale Collection of American Literature’s great strength in printed, manuscript, and visual materials documenting American Poetry is its outstanding collection of materials relating to the life and writing of Walt Whitman. One of the most important works of American Literature, Whitman’s Leaves of Grass is a celebration of the democratic spirit, the emotional and intellectual power of literature and art, and of the poet himself. In this work, Whitman introduced a new mode of writing and of expression. In the 150 years since it was first published, Leaves of Grass and its author have played a crucial role in shaping American literature and America’s literary imagination. The Beinecke’s Whitman holdings contain copies of all major editions of Leaves of Grass, including five copies of the extraordinarily rare first edition, published in 1855, and several copies of the 1856 second edition, featuring a quotation from a letter Whitman received from Ralph Waldo Emerson in response to the first edition: “I greet you at the beginning of a great career…”  In addition to printed works, the Library’s Walt Whitman Collection contains letters, manuscripts, photographs, art, and other material dating from 1842-1949, and features the Whitmania of Yale benefactors Owen Aldis, Louis Mayer Rabinowitz, Adrian Van Sinderen and others. Outstanding manuscripts include Whitman’s early 1850s text “Pictures,” often called a prototype for poems in the 1855 edition of Leaves of Grass because its expansive energy predicts the experimental free verse that characterizes Whitman’s work. The Collection also includes numerous photographs of the poet. Whitman was quite conscious of his public persona and understood the powerful role that photography, still a new and developing technology, could play in helping him to reach his American audience. From the “rough” depicted in the portrait on the title page of the first edition of Leaves of Grass, to the respectable bard appearing in the edition published five years later, to the “Good Gray Poet” that emerged in the 1860s, Whitman’s photographic image evolved over the course of his career as a writer and public figure. The Whitman Collection also includes artworks and objects such as bronze medallions and Whitman’s own eyeglasses.

For more information about the Yale Collection of American Literature, contact Louise Bernard, Curator of Prose and Drama (louise.bernard@yale.edu) or Nancy Kuhl, Curator of Poetry (nancy.kuhl@yale.edu). Multitudes: A Celebration of the Yale Collection American Literature was organized with the assistance of Charlotte Parker, Y’2013.

Psyche & Muse Podcast

Posted in Announcements, Beinecke Collections, Exhibitions, Readings at Beinecke by beineckepoetry on April 28, 2011

A new podcast related to the exhibition Psyche & Muse: Creative Entanglements with the Science of the Soul  is now available: A. A. Brill and Mabel Dodge Luhan: A Reading from their Correspondence, by  Patricia Everett & Paul Lippmann, recorded at the Beinecke Library on Tuesday, March 29, 2011.

Psychoanalyst A. A. Brill maintained an active correspondence with his patient Mabel Dodge Luhan, a writer and New York salon hostess. Luhan’s analysis began in June 1916 and continued until she moved to Taos, New Mexico, in December 1917, after which analyst and writer corresponded for nearly thirty years. This reading from the Mabel Dodge Luhan Papers presents a selection of letters that reflect the highly personal, expressive, and exploratory nature of their correspondence. Luhan recounted her dreams and reported on her current mental states. Brill responded with advice, warmth, and forceful interpretations. These letters provide views into often inaccessible aspects of analytic relationships. Patricia Everett, Ph.D. is a psychologist in private practice in Amherst, Massachusetts. She is the author of A History Of Having A Great Many Times Not Continued To Be Friends: The Correspondence Between Mabel Dodge and Gertrude Stein, 1911–1934 (University of New Mexico Press, 1996). A 2005 Beinecke Library A. Bartlett Giamatti Visiting Research Fellow, she recently completed a book manuscript entitled The Dreams of Mabel Dodge and is currently editing the correspondence between Mabel Dodge Luhan and A. A. Brill. Paul Lippmann, Ph.D. is a fellow, a member of the faculty, and a training and supervising analyst at the William Alanson White Institute. He is in private practice in Stockbridge, Massachusetts, and is director of the Stockbridge Dream Society. He is the author of Nocturnes: On Listening to Dreams(The Analytic Press, 2000).

Information about and images from the Luhan archive are available online: Mabel Dodge Luhan Papers (YCAL MSS 196) ; Image Guide to the Luhan Papers .

Beinecke Library podcasts are available through iTunes U: http://itunes.yale.edu/ .

Kevin Young at Yale

Posted in Announcements, Exhibitions, Poetry at Yale, Readings at Yale by beineckepoetry on April 1, 2011

Tuesday, April 5 at 4:00, Yale University Art Gallery (YUAG), The Schlesinger Visiting Writer Series presents:
Kevin Young, the Atticus Haygood Professor of English and Creative Writing, and Curator of Literary Collections and the Raymond Danowski Poetry Library, Emory University.

A reading in conjunction with the Yale University Art Gallery’s current exhibition, Embodied: Black Identities in American Art from the Yale University Art Gallery. The exhibition, a collaboration among a team of students from Yale and the University of Maryland, College Park, features works that address, question, and complicate the paradigms that have mapped meanings onto African American bodies throughout history. The 54 works selected for the exhibition, representing the Gallery’s commitment during the past decade to growing this area of the collection, include paintings, sculpture, decorative arts, prints, drawings, and photographs.

Sponsored by the Yale University Art Gallery, the Schlesinger Visiting Writer Series, and the Departments of African American Studies and English, and the Beinecke Library.