Poetry at Beinecke Library

Psyche & Muse: Events

Posted in Announcements, Beinecke Collections, Exhibitions, Readings at Beinecke by beineckepoetry on January 20, 2011

Please join us at the Beinecke Library for the following events to be held in conjunction with Psyche & Muse: Creative Entanglements with the Science of the Soul, an exhibition exploring points of contact between the arts and the study of the mind. All events are free and open to the public.

Freud’s Impossible Life: An Introduction
A lecture by Adam Phillips
Friday, February 25, 2011, 5:00 pm
Writer and psychoanalyst Adam Phillips is the author of more than ten books, including Side Effects; On Terrors and Experts; Promises, Promises: Essays on Poetry and Psychoanalysis; and On Kissing, Tickling, and Being Bored: Psychoanalytic Essays on the Unexamined Life. He is a frequent contributor to The New York Times, the London Review of Books, and The Observer. Dr. Phillips is the general editor of the Penguin Classics Freud series; he is currently at work on a new biography of Sigmund Freud to be published in the Yale University Press Jewish Lives Series.

Withdrawal Slips or The Psychopathology of Paperwork
A lecture by Ben Kafka
Thursday, March 17, 2011, 4:00 pm
Ben Kafka is an assistant professor of the history and theory of media at New York University and a candidate at the Institute for Psychoanalytic Training and Research (IPA). His first book, The Demon of Writing: Powers and Failures of Paperwork, will be published by Zone Books. He is currently working on a history of graphology. His talk points to the intersections of mind and medium, psychoanalysis and book history, in an examination of Freud and paperwork. Withdrawal Slips is a featured event in the Beinecke Lectures in the History of the Book Series.

A. A. Brill and Mabel Dodge Luhan: A Reading from their Correspondence
by Patricia Everett & Paul Lippmann
Tuesday, March 29, 2011, 5:00 pm
Psychoanalyst A. A. Brill maintained an active correspondence with his patient Mabel Dodge Luhan, a writer and New York salon hostess. Luhan’s analysis began in June 1916 and continued until she moved to Taos, New Mexico, in December 1917, after which analyst and writer corresponded for nearly thirty years. This reading from the Mabel Dodge Luhan Papers presents a selection of letters that reflect the highly personal, expressive, and exploratory nature of their correspondence. Luhan recounted her dreams and reported on her current mental states. Brill responded with advice, warmth, and forceful interpretations. These letters provide views into often inaccessible aspects of analytic relationships. Patricia Everett, Ph.D. is a psychologist in private practice in Amherst, Massachusetts. She is the author of A History Of Having A Great Many Times Not Continued To Be Friends: The Correspondence Between Mabel Dodge and Gertrude Stein, 1911–1934 (University of New Mexico Press, 1996). A 2005 Beinecke Library A. Bartlett Giamatti Visiting Research Fellow, she recently completed a book manuscript entitled The Dreams of Mabel Dodge and is currently editing the correspondence between Mabel Dodge Luhan and A. A. Brill. Paul Lippmann, Ph.D. is a fellow, a member of the faculty, and a training and supervising analyst at the William Alanson White Institute. He is in private practice in Stockbridge, Massachusetts, and is director of the Stockbridge Dream Society. He is the author of Nocturnes: On Listening to Dreams (The Analytic Press, 2000).

For more information, contact Rebecca Martz: rebecca.martz@yale.edu.

Image: Sigmund Freud, A General Introduction to Psychoanalysis, G. Stanley Hall trans., NY: Boni and Liveright [1920]; manuscript notes by Scofield Thayer (Za T3384 Zz920F).

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